Don’t Shrink Your Estate with Last Minute Tax Planning

In the best-case scenario, you’d start talking with your estate planning attorney early on about your overall goals and the various tools available for tax planning and transfer wealth to the next generation. Whether your estate is modest or significant, the article “A Recipe for Risk—Last-Minute Tax Planning for Estates” from The Legal Intelligencer explains how a last-minute plan failed on a grand scale. A recent memorandum opinion from the U.S. Tax Court provides a cautionary tale.

Howard Moore owned a large amount of property and ran a successful farm. He was admitted to the hospital late in 2004, was discharged to hospice and told he only had six months to live. He created an estate plan that included a family limited partnership (FLP), a living trust, a charitable lead annuity trust, a trust for the adult children, a management trust that acted as the general partner of the family limited partnership and an “Irrevocable Trust No. 1” that was created to act as a conduit for the transfer of funds from the FLP to a charitable foundation.

The primary focus of the plan was to transfer the farm to a living trust and then to transfer 80% of the farm property to the FLP. The management trust was to serve as a partner to the FLP, with the living trust owning almost all the limited partnership interests and with each of the decedent’s children owning a 1% partnership interest. The FLP was to offer protection against liabilities from the use of pesticides, potential bad marriages, creditors and the fact that the family was a bit dysfunctional and would need to work together to manage the FLP. The FLP had many transfer restrictions and the limited partners were not given any rights to participate in business management or operational decisions regarding the FLP.

The trust known as “Irrevocable Trust No. 1” was nominally funded at the time of the decedent’s death and received funding from the FLP. Those funds, in turn, were transferred to the charitable trust to gain a charitable deduction by the estate. Just before he died, Moore used FLP funds to make large transfers to his children that were designated as loans. He also made outright gifts to the children and to one grandchild.

The estate filed an estate tax return and a gift tax return after Moore’s death. The IRS issued a notice of deficiency for nearly $6.4 million and the case went to tax court. The U. S. Tax Court agreed with the IRS’ findings. The defense of the estate plan, the tax court maintained, was form over substance and the only reason for the estate plan and the numerous transactions was to save estate taxes.

There were a lot of hurdles in this case, in addition to the short time period for the estate plan to have been created. At the time of the decedent’s hospitalization, the sale of the farm to a neighbor was being negotiated. A contract to sell the farm was executed with days of transferring it to the living trust. There were numerous transfers and distributions made between trusts and the FLP, and the court concluded that all decisions about the FLP after its formation were made unilaterally by the decedent. An FLP is supposed to function as a true partnership. Many other issues and errors occurred in the rush to have this estate structured in such a short period of time.

Had Moore engaged in tax planning five or ten years earlier, there would have been time to create a plan in which both the substance and execution of the plan were sound and the family would have been able to save millions of dollars in taxes. By waiting until his death was imminent, the plan attempted to establish transfer requirements without the opportunity to execute them properly.

Reference: The Legal Intelligencer (May 18, 2020) “A Recipe for Risk—Last-Minute Tax Planning for Estates”

 

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Should I Use My 401(k) in the Pandemic ?
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Should I Use My 401(k) in the Pandemic ?

Many Americans are struggling with what to do with their retirement savings, as we endure the COVID-19 pandemic. Many don’t know if they should stand pat or cash in their savings and are asking should I use my 401(k) in the pandemic ?

The new CARES Act makes it easier for us to tap our retirement accounts and 401(k) in the pandemic.  However, there may be significant long-term effects for your financial security.

The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act was passed by Congress signed into law by President Trump on March 27. The law provides more than $2 trillion in economic relief to protect the American people from the public health and economic impacts of COVID-19. The Act provides fast and direct economic assistance for American workers, families and small businesses, as well as preserving jobs for American industries.

CNBC’s recent article entitled “Tapping Your 401(k): Is now the right time to do it?” says that if you need emergency cash, and your 401(k) in the pandemic is your only source of funds, taking a short-term loan from your retirement account as a “last resort” may be a wise option.

While you will be repaying yourself rather than paying 11% interest on average on a personal loan, know that you’re borrowing from your financial future and possibly risking your financial security in retirement.

The CARES Act lets you to borrow up to $100,000 (double the previous loan limit of $50,000) from your 401(k) and delay repayment for up to a year. After you borrow, you’ll typically have to repay the loan within five years, depending on the terms of your 401(k) plan. Under the CARES Act, loan payments due in 2020 can be delayed for up to a year from the time you take out the loan. However, if you can’t pay back the loan within the time frame designated by your plan, your outstanding balance will be taxed like a withdrawal. That means you’ll also pay a 10% early withdrawal penalty.

If you leave your job — regardless of  whether by choice — there’s a good chance your plan will require you to repay the money back quickly. If you don’t, your account balance will be decreased by the amount owed and considered a taxable distribution. This choice must factor in the length of time before you need your money, your ability to save, and your comfort level with risk.

You can also take a penalty-free distribution from your IRA or 401(k) of up to 100% of your balance or $100,000, whichever is less. You aren’t required to pay the 10% early withdrawal penalty, if you’re under age 59½ and you can pay taxes on the money you take out over a period of three years or pay no tax, if you pay it all back. However, your employer must agree to adopt these new rules for your existing 401(k) plan.

Reference: CNBC (April 20, 2020) “Tapping Your 401(k): Is now the right time to do it?”

Suggested Key Terms: Estate Planning Lawyer, Legislation, Tax Planning, Financial Planning, IRA, 401(k)

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Advance Designation of Representative Payee for Social Security

Advance Designation of Representative Payee for Social Security – For many years, people have had the right to designate an agent to handle a number of different legal, business and medical matters. That includes finances, medical decisions, wills and even funerals. What Americans have not been able to do until now, says the article “Social Security and you: New Advance Designation for Representative Payee” from The Dallas Morning News, is designate an agent to handle Social Security benefits.

As of April 6, 2020, the Social Security Administration announced that there is a new option that lets a recipient make an Advance Designation that names a person to serve as your “ representative payee .” This is a really big deal, but it hasn’t received too many headlines.

Maybe that’s because under this law, anyone could apply to be a representative payee, receiving someone else’s Social Security payment and using it to pay the recipient’s living expenses. There’s a lot of room for abuse.

The best way forward? Make a decision and name a person while you have capacity. The Advance Designation option is only available to “capable” adults and emancipated minors who are applying for or receiving Social Security benefits, Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or Special Veterans Benefits.

A Social Security recipient can name as many as three people, who could serve as a representative payee if the need arises. There’s a lot of flexibility: you can withdraw your choices, change the order of the three people and name new people at any time. Just in case anyone forgets who they named, Social Security is going to send a notice each year, listing advance designees for review.

How will it work? When the SSA believes a person needs help managing benefits, they will contact the advance designees. The SSA reserves the right to discard your choices and make its own appointment.

How do you make the designation? Go online to the SSA website, especially now when phone, in-person and in writing are all either backlogged or not possible to do right now. After you’ve created and successfully logged into the mysocialsecurity website, you’ll see a box titled “Advance Designation of Representative Payee.” It will be towards the bottom of the page. You’ll need the name, phone number and a description of the relationship you have with the person.

Who should you name? The SSA prefers family members, friends or qualified organizations. Your choices should be made carefully. The people you name need to be trustworthy, good with finances, organized and have no prior felonies. They will need to be able to maintain good records and receipts and be available and responsive, if the SSA requests an audit or an in-person visit.

When should you do this? How about now? Like having a will and an estate plan, this is not something that you should put off. And as you are likely at home, there’s no reason not to!

Reference: The Dallas Morning News (April 19, 2020) “Social Security and you: New Advance Designation for Representative Payee”

 

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How Low Interest Rates Create Estate Planning Opportunities

One result of the global health crisis is that interest rates are lower now than they have been in many, many years. The April 2020 AFRs (Applicable Federal Rates), which are used to determine the least amount of interest that has to be charged for below-market loans and are often used for intrafamily lending, have decreased to 0.91 percent for loans less than 36 months, 0.99 percent for loans of 36 months or more and less than nine years, and 1.44 percent for loans of nine years or longer.

The article, titled “Estate Planning in a Low Interest Rate Environment,” from The National Law Review Journal, explains that for families where intrafamily lending has already occurred, these low interest rates provide a chance to amend the terms of current promissory notes to obtain these rates.

There are two opportunities presented:

  • The amount that the borrower needs to repay is reduced, thereby easing the burden on a borrower who has a cash flow problem.
  • If a parent has already lent money to a child who will eventually inherit assets from the parent, this lower interest rate will help to facilitate wealth transfer. The parent will receive lower payments under the note, minimizing the assets that are added back to the lender’s taxable estate.

Here are a few situations where these loans are typically used:

  • Parents extend a loan to adult child, who is going through a challenging financial period.
  • Parent lends money to a child with the understanding that the child will invest the money at a higher rate of return than the interest charged under the note, thus allowing growth to occur in the child’s estate rather than in the parent’s estate.
  • Complex estate planning, where a sale is made to an intentionally defective trust, where the seller’s goal is to freeze the value of the estate for a price at which the asset was sold on an installment basis. This allows future growth to take place outside of the seller’s taxable estate.

These intrafamily loans are usually part of sophisticated estate planning. Other methods include Grantor Retained Annuity Trusts (GRATs), or Charitable Lead Trusts (CLTs), which also become more attractive in a low interest rates environment.

With a GRAT, there is a transfer of assets to a trust, in which the settlor retains an annuity payment for a certain number of years. At the end of the term, the remaining assets pass to the trust beneficiaries with no estate tax implication. The CLT operates in a similar way, except that the payment for a specified number of years is made to a charity.

Speak with an experienced estate planning attorney about how your estate could benefit from the current low interest rates environment.

Reference: The National Law Review (April 13, 2020) “Estate Planning in a Low Interest Rate Environment”

 

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Why Gifting during Volatile Markets Makes Sense

Gifting assets to a trust for children or grandchildren is often an important part of an estate plan. The recent article “Is Now a Good Time to Make a Gift?” from The National Law Review takes a close look into the strategy of placing non-cash assets into a trust, without exceeding the annual gift tax exclusion amount or the Federal Gift Tax Exemption. If those assets increase in value later, the increases will further enhance the gift for beneficiaries.

Taxes on gifts made to a trust to benefit children and grandchildren are based primarily on the value of the gift. Annual exclusion gifts, that is, transfers of assets or cash that do not exceed the annual gift tax exclusion, are currently set at $15,000 per recipient per year. A married couple may give up to $30,000 per person in any calendar year. Many annual exclusion gifts do not require a Federal Gift Tax Return (Form 709), although it would be wise to speak with an estate planning attorney to make sure that this applies to you, since every situation is different.

Annual exclusion gifts are one way to reduce the overall value of the estate, but they do not reduce the Federal Estate Tax Exemption of the person making the gift.

Gifts in excess of the annual exclusion amount may still avoid gift taxes, if the person making the gift applies their gift tax exemption by filing IRS Form 709. The gift tax exemption is unified with the estate tax exemption, at $11.58 million per person in 2020. Gifts that are bigger than the annual exclusion of $15,000 per year, reduce the $11.58 million exemption for purposes of both the gift tax and the estate tax.

For example, if a person were to make taxable gifts of $1.0 million to a child in 2020, their lifetime gift tax and estate tax exemption will be reduced to $10.58 million. If that person were to die in 2020 when the applicable estate tax exemption is $10.58 million, then only estate assets in excess of the exemption will be subject to estate tax.

Given the uncertainly of the gift and estate tax exemptions, management and timing of these gifts is particularly important. If no legislative action occurs, these generous estate and gift tax exemptions will sunset at the end of 2025. They will return to the 2010 level of $5.0 million, indexed for inflation.

The exemptions need to be carefully used and budgeted, because federal estate tax starts at 18% and rises to 40% on all amounts over the exemption. Like the exemption, these rate rates may be changed by future elections and/or tax law changes.

If you are concerned about an estate becoming taxable, the current decline in asset values makes this a good opportunity to transfer more of the estate into trust for beneficiaries. The transfers can decrease the impact of a reduction in the exemption amount, as well as any changes to the tax rates. The currently reduced value of stocks and many other investments may also present an opportunity to reduce future taxes.

The best way forward would be to have a conversation with an estate planning attorney to review your overall estate plan and how moving assets into trusts during a time of lowered value could benefit the estate and its beneficiaries.

Reference: The National Law Review (April 10, 2020) “Is Now a Good Time to Make a Gift?”

Suggested Key Terms: Estate Planning, Assets, Trust, Gift Tax Exclusion Amount, Federal Gift Tax Exemptions

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Coronavirus Stimulus Allows Retirees to Tap Funds Early, With Little or No Penalties

For a limited time, Americans will now be able to withdraw money from tax-deferred accounts without penalties, under the Coronavirus Stimulus law. Rules on taking loans from 401(k)s will also be loosened up, and some retirees will be able to avoid Required Minimum Distributions (RMDs) that otherwise would have been costly, says the article “Coronavirus stimulus lets struggling Americans tap retirement accounts early” from the Los Angeles Times.

In some cases, these changes reflect what has been done for retirement savers in previous disasters. However, for the most part, these are more intense than in other events. The chief government affairs officer of the American Retirement Association, Will Hansen, says that we are now in uncharted territory as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic. The numbers of people filing for unemployment make it likely that many people will be tapping their retirement accounts.

One provision in the bill would allow investors of any age to take as much as $100,000 from their retirement accounts without any early withdrawal penalties. If the money is put back in the account within three years, there won’t be any taxes due. If the money is not put back, taxes can be paid over the course of three years. The law says that the money must be a “coronavirus-related distribution,” but the rules are loose.

People who test positive for the virus, along with anyone who experiences adverse financial consequences as a result of the pandemic, including being unable to find work or childcare, are permitted to make these withdrawals.

The bill also makes it easier to borrow money from 401(k) accounts, raising the limit on these loans from $50,000 to $100,000. The payment dates for any loans due in 2020 are extended for a year.

Retirees in their early 70s were previously required to start taking money out of tax-deferred accounts and start paying taxes on those distributions. The bill also waives these rules.

U.S. individual retirement accounts held nearly $20 trillion in assets at the end of 2019. While those amounts have certainly dropped due to market volatility, Americans still hold a lot of money in retirement accounts.

However, pre- and post-retirees need to think carefully about withdrawing large sums of money now. For pre-retirees, this should only be a last resort. Some professionals think the 401(k)-loan amount is too high and that people will jump to take out too much money, which will never find its way back.

According to a U.S. Government Accountability Office report from 2019, Americans ages 25-55 take approximately $69 billion a year from their retirement accounts. Once the money is gone, it’s not able to earn future tax-deferred returns.

Reference: Los Angeles Times (March 27, 2020) “Coronavirus stimulus lets struggling Americans tap retirement accounts early”

 

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Transferring a Home to Your Kids Is Never Good Estate Planning

Transferring a Home to Your Kids may seem like a simple approach for avoiding having the house go through probate, or even qualifying easily for Medicaid. However, this seemingly simple solution comes with many problems, including taxes and the potential for years of delay for qualifying for Medicaid. That’s the advice from the article “Don’t Give Your Adult Kids Your House” from Nerd Wallet.

There are many other ways to transfer a house to family members. Estate planning lawyers will be able to help you accomplish this, without creating extra problems for your family.

First, if you leave the house to your children in your will, which means they don’t get it until you die, they receive something called a “step-up in basis.” This means that all of the appreciation of the house that occurred during the time that you owned the house until your death is not taxed.

Here’s an example. A financial planner advises his client not to let his mother gift him the family home. She paid $16,000 for it back in 1976, and the current market value of the house was close to $200,000. None of that increase in value would be taxable if the son inherited the house. However, she signed a quitclaim to give her son the house while she was living and died shortly afterwards. The estimated tax bill was about $32,000.

Some families who realize the impact of this when it’s almost too late, scramble to give the house back to the parents. They do a last-minute deed change, before it’s too late. There isn’t always time for this.

When it comes to transferring the house, so a parent can qualify for Medicaid, there’s a five-year look back that prohibits any transfer of assets, especially of a house. That can lead to a penalty period, so the senior who needs long-term care will not be eligible for Medicaid.

Transferring a home to an adult child with financial or marital problems is asking for trouble. If the house becomes the child’s asset, then it can be attached by creditors. If a divorce occurs, the home will be an asset to be divided by the couple—or lost completely.

As for the family in the example above, the man was almost stuck paying taxes on a $184,000 gain. A tax research firm he engaged learned of a workaround, Section 2036 of the Internal Revenue Code. If the mother retained a life interest in the property, which includes the right to continue living there, then the home would remain in her estate, rather than be treated as a completed gift. The son, as executor of the estate, filed a gift tax return on her behalf to show that he was given a “remainder interest” or the right to inherit, when his mother’s life interest expired at her death.

There are less stressful and less costly ways to avoid the family home being part of the probated estate. Let an experienced estate planning attorney help your family before costly, time-consuming and stressful mistakes are made.

Reference: Nerd Wallet (April 3, 2020) “Don’t Give Your Adult Kids Your House”

Suggested Key Terms: Step-Up in Basis, Probate, Estate Planning Attorney, Quitclaim, Inheritance, Medicaid, Taxes

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Extended Deadlines – Massive Changes to RMDs from Stimulus Plan

Extended Deadlines – Several of the provisions that were signed into law in the relief bill can taken advantage of immediately, reports Financial Planning in the article “Major changes in RMDs and retirement contributions in $2T stimulus plan.” Here are some highlights.

Extended deadline for 2019 IRA contributions. With the tax return filing date extended to July 15, 2020 from April 16, the date for making 2019 contributions to IRA and Roth IRA contributions has also been extended to the same date. Those contributions normally must be made by April 15 of the following year, but this is no normal year. There have never been extensions to the April 15 deadline, even when taxpayers filed for extensions.

When this tax return deadline was extended, most financial professionals doubted the extension would only apply to IRA contributions, but the IRS responded in a timely manner, issuing guidance titled “Filing and Payment Deadlines Questions and Answers.” These changes give taxpayers more time to decide if they still want to contribute, and how much. Job losses and market downturns that accompanied the COVID-19 outbreak have changed the retirement savings priorities for many Americans. Just be sure when you do make a contribution to your account, note that it is for 2019 because financial custodians may just automatically consider it for 2020. A phone call to confirm will likely be in order.

RMDs are waived for 2020. As a result of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act (CARE Act), Required Minimum Distributions from IRAs are waived. Prior to the law’s passage, 2020 RMDs would be very high, as they would be based on the substantially higher account values of December 31, 2019. If not for this relief, IRA owners would have to withdraw and pay tax on a much larger percentage of their IRA balances. By eliminating the RMD for 2020, tax bills will be lower for those who don’t need to take the money from their accounts. For 2019 RMDs not yet taken, the waiver still applies. It also applies to IRA owners who turned 70 ½ in 2019. This was a surprise, as the SECURE Act just increased the RMD age to 72 for those who turn 70 ½ in 2020 or later.

IRA beneficiaries subject to the five- year rule. Another group benefitting from these the rules are beneficiaries who inherited in 2015 or later and are subject to the 5-year payout rule. Those beneficiaries may have inherited through a will or were beneficiaries of a trust that didn’t qualify as a designated beneficiary. They now have one more year—until December 31, 2021—to withdraw the entire amount in the account. Beneficiaries who inherited from 2015-2020 now have six years, instead of five.

Additional relief for retirement accounts. The new act also waives the early 10% early distribution penalty on up to $100,000 of 2020 distributions from IRAs and company plans for ‘affected individuals.’ The tax will still be due, but it can be spread over three years and the funds may be repaid over the three-year period.

Many changes have been implemented from the new legislation. Speak with your estate planning attorney to be sure that you are taking full advantage of the changes and not running afoul of any new or old laws regarding retirement accounts.

Reference: Financial Planning (March 27, 2020) “Major changes in RMDs and retirement contributions in $2T stimulus plan”

Suggested Key Terms: RMDs, Required Minimum Distribution, IRAs, Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act, CARE Act, Extended Deadlines

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What Do I Need to Know Before I have Mom Move in with My Family ?
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What Do I Need to Know Before I have Mom Move in with My Family ?

Mom Move in with My Family ? Multigenerational living can help an aging parent avoid the sense of isolation and depression that may come with living alone. However, by this time in life, you have a set way of doing things. Your likes, dislikes, value, and personalities have also changed over time.

AARP’s article from 2018 asks “Considering Moving Your Loved One into Your Home?” This is still a timely article. It notes that, regardless of how close and loving your relationship may be, adding another person to your household changes the dynamics for the entire family. The journey will be smoother, if you and your loved one go in with some clear parameters.

First, prior to having Mom Move in with My Family, ask yourself a few questions:

  • How will the move impact my spouse, children and my siblings?
  • How will my parent’s presence impact my family routine, activities and privacy?
  • Will I need to remodel the house or add a bedroom or bath?
  • Will my siblings help with some expenses?
  • Can we afford to do this?
  • Should part of my parent’s income be used to help defray living expenses?
  • Will this change require me to alter my work schedule?
  • How will I create boundaries?
  • How does my parent feel about moving in with my family?
  • How do I feel about this change?

Next, your parent should consider these questions.

  • Will this move take me away from people or activities I enjoy?
  • Do I like being with this family for long periods of time?
  • Are they expecting me to contribute some of my income or savings to living expenses?
  • If the home requires remodeling to accommodate me, am I able to help pay for it?
  • Will my other children help out?
  • If I don’t like something my child does, am I comfortable talking to him about it?
  • What are my feelings about being dependent?

You should then have an open and frank discussion about expectations, fears, finances and any lingering issues. It may be as easy as telling each other what bothers you (since the other person may not otherwise know and would be happy to make a change).

After this, create a list of the positive aspects and refer to it when you have a bad day with the arrangement.

Next, conduct a pair of meetings. Let your children know that they’re not the cause of their grandparent’s possible negative reactions, such as anger, weeping or fear. Tell them that the whole family needs to contribute, but they aren’t responsible for caregiving or fixing their grandparent. Discuss ways that the children can help their grandparent.

The other meeting is with your siblings. In addition to acknowledging that your parent needs help and will likely need more, it can be an emotional realization for all of you. Talk it out. You also shouldn’t be shy about asking for help.

Gifts of time are important in helping you manage other responsibilities in your life. Let your siblings know about your anticipated needs, like serving as a back-up and respite care, help with chores, meals delivered, grocery and prescription pickup and money to offset increased living expenses or to hire an aide.

Reference: AARP (Jan. 22, 2018) “Considering Moving Your Loved One into Your Home?”

 

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Where in the World Do You Go to Retire If You Like The Snow?

There are many people who imagine playing golf in Arizona or lying on the beach in Florida during retirement. However, that is not everybody. There are some who would rather bundle up and enjoy the snow, says Investopedia in its recent article entitled “5 Best Countries to Retire to If You Love Winter.”

Let’s look at some of the snowy spots around the globe where retirees who like to ski, ice state, and make snowmen or snow angels can retire.

Italy. Most everyone knows about the art, food, and rich culture in Italy, but the country’s inland is a winter lover’s dream. Specifically, the Abruzzo region is a great place for retirees who like to ski. Retirees can apply for an elective residency visa with the Italian consulate. This permits a retiree to stay in Italy. However, this visa doesn’t allow you to work. In five years, you’re eligible to apply for a long-term resident visa.

France. You have certainly seen that this country is beautiful all year round. However, it’s fantastic during the winter when snow can be found in many regions. France has several spots where retirees can ski, including the Northern and Southern Alps, the Pyrenees and Massif Central—Europe’s largest volcanic site. Although the overall cost of living is a bit higher than in the U.S., the expense of renting an apartment or a home is quite affordable. Retirees can apply for a long-stay visitor visa through the French consulate. It’s valid for a year, and if you want to stay in France for a longer period of time, you’ll must apply for an extension. Similar to the Italian visa, the French visa doesn’t let you to work while you are there.

Switzerland. This country enjoys lower taxes and extremely good healthcare. These are two good reasons to consider retiring in Switzerland. Along with skiing, retirees can participate in curling, snowshoeing, and many other cold weather activities. Another advantage is Switzerland’s central European location which makes it ideal for winter breaks in Germany, France, or Italy. Like the other European countries mentioned, to retire in Switzerland, you’ll need to apply for a visa through the consulate.  Like in France and Italy, you’re not allowed to work there. It’s also important to know that Switzerland is not keen on foreign nationals applying for public benefits. As a result, it’s important that you have enough saved up to support yourself if you move.

Let’s now look at a few countries outside of Europe that promise plenty of fun during the winter:

New Zealand. This country has become an increasingly popular spot for expatriate retirees. The northern island has a warmer, more temperate climate. However, the southern island gets a good deal of snow in the winter. Remember: the seasons are reversed, so winter with the snow is between June and October. Unless you have children who live in the country, you’re required to apply for a temporary residency visa that’s renewable every two years. If you’re thinking of moving to New Zealand permanently, you’ll need to apply for a resident visa. It’s also important for retirees to know that the financial conditions in New Zealand may be difficult for the average retiree. That means it’s expensive!

Chile. A quick look at the map will tell you that Chile is geographically diverse. Running more than 2,600 miles, the southern region of the country is a skier’s paradise during the winter months. The Portillo Ski Resort is world-renowned. There are also almost two dozen skiing destinations sprinkled through the Andes. The Chilean government issues temporary visas for retirees that are good for a year. You can renew your visa for an additional year, but then you must apply for “definitive residence” or leave the country.

Retiring overseas is a big move, so be sure to calculate what retiring abroad will cost to determine whether it’s a good fit for you financially.

Reference: Investopedia (January 14, 2020) “5 Best Countries to Retire to If You Love Winter”

 

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